Facebook and other platforms no longer provide merely an outlet for individuals to express their highs and lows of the day, but they also offer a channel for societal change, tools for law enforcement and real-time industry trends for businesses. Perhaps you use social media for your business, but you may also use your Facebook page for your personal purposes.

After all, there is no social media without the social aspect. Most people use their Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts to connect with friends and family and to share the details of their lives. However, if you are going through a divorce, social media may not have the benefits it seems to have in other realms. In fact, it is wise to avoid certain topics altogether when you post on social media.

Potential damage from a Facebook post

One other innovative use of social media is its growing presence as evidence in the courtroom, including in divorce cases. Many divorce attorneys admit that they explore the Facebook pages of their clients’ spouses to find information they can use in court. If you are facing asset division, custody or support issues related to your divorce, certain posts may leave you at a disadvantage if your ex uses them against you, for example:

  • Posts that suggest you may be an unfit parent, such as pictures of you intoxicated, partying, participating in illegal or reckless behavior, or comments that can lead others to question your parental abilities
  • Posts that indicate you may be mentally or emotionally unstable, including references to your emotional breakdowns, hints that you are depressed, or details about your private counseling or therapy sessions
  • Confidential information that may cause you or your spouse shame or even professional repercussions, even if you make the post in the heat of an argument and take it down soon after
  • Rants or insults directed at your ex since the court may interpret these as evidence of your unstable behavior or that you may direct such toxic comments toward your children
  • Posts about a new romantic interest

Not only might details or hints that you have a new boyfriend or girlfriend cause further resentment between you and your ex, but it may also upset your children. More practically, the court may begin to suspect that you are using marital assets to fund any gifts, trips or other expenses related to your new romance, and this could damage the outcome of your divorce. In fact, before posting any sensitive or potentially explosive information on social media, you would be wise to seek the advice of your Pennsylvania attorney.